Voyages to the new world by the Hopewell

Extracted from http://www.winthropsociety.com/ships.php
THE GREAT MIGRATION: SHIPS TO NEW ENGLAND 1633-35
It’s an amazing story of Providence and the skill of English seamen that dozens of Atlantic ocean passages were made in little wooden ships bringing our Puritan ancestors to America almost without mishap in the 1630’s; the unhappy exception being the harrowing story of the Angel Gabriel, 1635, which met a terrible storm and cast up on the coast of Maine with only a few survivors.
There were perhaps 30,000 emigrants from England to New England before the English Civil War. These folks were mainly from the English middle-class, self-reliant and motivated to find a place where they might live, worship, and raise their families without government harassment. This movement of people is called the Great Migration.
Their motivation was religious, political, and economic. The British church and government was becoming insufferably hierarchical, tyrannical, and tax-hungry. Common resentment among the English people led soon to the English Revolution beginning in 1642, and eventually to the beheading of King Charles for treason in 1649, after agents intercepted his secret invitations to foreign kings and armies, that they invade England, crush Parliament and the English Constitution, massacre his English opponents, and restore Charles to his pretended Dei gratia royal privileges. Charles Stuart continued incorrigibly to hold his dynastic interest separate and above those of Parliament and the British people, and ultimately Parliament had no alternative but to end his conspiracies with an axe.
The Great Migration ended at the start of the English Civil War. Then for a time in the 1640’s was hope rekindled in the people that they might live in liberty in England, and the flow of emigrants ceased, in fact reversed. Many brave New Englishmen and their sons returned to fight in England to uphold Parliament and the Commonwealth.
PASSENGER SHIPS OF THE GREAT MIGRATION
• The Recovery, Master Gabriel Cornish, 1633;
• The Elizabeth, Master William Andrewes, 1634;
• The Francis, Master John Cutting, 1634;
• The Christian, Master John White, sailed March 1634/35;
• The Hopewell, Master William Bundocke, first passage of 1635;
• The James, Master William Cooper, first passage of 1635;
• The Planter, Master Nicolas Travice, sailed April 1635;
• The Elizabeth, Master William Stagg, sailed April 1635;
• The Increase, Master Robert Lea, sailed April 1635;
• The Elizabeth & Ann, Master Robert Cooper, sailed May, 1635;
• The Susan & Ellin, Master Edward Payne, sailed May, 1635;
• The Abigail, Master Robert Hackwell, sailed July, 1635;
• The Defence, Master Edward Bostocke, sailed July, 1635;
• The Blessing, Master John Lester, sailed July, 1635;
• The James, Master John May, second voyage of 1635;
• The Hopewell, Master Thomas Babb, second voyage of 1635;
• The Truelove, Master John Gibbs, sailed September, 1635;

Paraphrased from http://familysearch.50megs.com/SHIPS.htm
The Hopewell
Although commanded by the Capt Henry Hudson on earlier voyages, the voyage to America in the 1630’s were not under Capt Henry Hudson. These voyages produced some passenger lists of particular interest as the vast majority of the passengers were children. They were mostly young and our ancestor was amongst them. His name was Foster and he was only 14 years of age and was not accompanied by an adult as were many of the children. At first I thought they must be children of earlier [settlers], but then I came across some interesting reading materials on old London town. It seems, the upper class in London were getting very frustrated with the many street children running loose in London. They began arresting them for almost anything and they stood trial. I read of one such child being hung for stealing a loaf of bread. Most were chosen to be shipped off to America to be adopted by colonists who had already lost their own children to the hardships of the frontier or who wanted nothing more than slaves. John Foster, our ancestor was on such a ship at the age of 14 and he was alone. I believe he was not adopted as he grew up with the foster name
Voyages to the new world by the Hopewell:
Departure
Date Departure
Point Master Arrival
Date Arrival
Point Notes
1622 Elizabeth City Virginia? The Winthrop Fleet consisted of eleven ships sailing from Yarmouth, Isle of Wright to Salem. Some sailed April 8, arriving June 13, 1630 and the following days, the others to sail in May, arriving in July. The total count of passengers is believed to be about seven hundred. Financing was by the Mass. Bay Company.
1623 Elizabeth City
James City Virginia?
1624 Elizabeth City Virginia?
unknown James City
James Island Virginia?
April 8 1630
Arbella (Flagship), Ambrose, Hopewell, Talbot

May 1630
Charles, Jewel, Mayflower, Success,
Trial, Whale,
William and Francis Yarmouth
Isle of Wright Peter Milburne June 13, 1630 Salem, MA The ships were the Arbella flagship with Capt Peter Milburne, the Ambrose, the Charles, the Mayflower, the Jewel, the Hopewell, The Success, the Trial, the Whale, the Talbot and the William and Francis.
1634/5 London Wood Barbadoes
1st April 1635 London William Bundocke 1635 Massachusetts Bay
May 8, 1635 Weymouth Dorsetshire John Driver
July or Sept 1635 London Thomas Babb 1635 Massachusetts Bay

The Hopewell Passenger List, second voyage of 1635, under Master Thomas Babb:
Albon Alice 25
Baylie Robert 23, #20
Blackly/Blackwell Thomas 20, #3, listed with Tredwells
Bull Thomas 25 (From Southwark, Surrey, Ref: Hinman. 36 pg 169)
Chambers Robert 13, #9
Chipperfield Edmond 20
Clark Mary 16
Cleven Joan 18
Edge Robert 25
Edwards Robert 22
Forten Jo. 14
Freeman Anthony 22
Grave Joan 30
Grave Mary 26
Heath Elizabeth 40
Heath Elizabeth 5
Heath Isack 50, Harnis maker (From Amwell, Little, Hertfordshire, bound for Roxbury as per 36 pg 66)* Heath William, same cities, is on the Lyon as per 36 pg 66))
Heath Martha 30
Hubbard Marie 24, #11
Hull Katherin 23
Hulls Andrew 29
Hutley Richard 15
Johnson Thomas 25, #10
Kerbie Jo. 12, #12 (Kerby, John, from Rowington, Warwickshire, bound for Plymouth. Ref: Wethersfield History. 36 pg 175)
Leaves Ellin 17
Lloyd Walter 27
Lyon William 14
Marshall Jo. 14
Maudsley Henry 24, #5
Miller Joseph 15
Norton William 25 (From Stortford’s Bishop’s, Hertfordshire, bound for Ipswitch as per 36 pg 71)
Pennaird Robert 21, a Turner or tanner
Pennaird Thomas 10
Prier Jo. 15 (John and Thomas Prior are listed on the Hopewell, from Watford, Hertford, bound for Scituate, as per 36 pg 71)
Pryer Daniell 13
Reld Gabriell 18
Robinson Isack 15, #14
Rofe Barbary 20
Stokes Grace 20
Thomas Jo. 14, #13
Ticknall Henrie 15
Toothaker Margaret 28
Toothaker Roger 1
Toothaker Roger 23
Tredwell Mary 30, smith #1
Tredwell, Thomas 1, #4
Tredwell, Thomas 30, #2
Turner Thomas 42
Weekes Anna 1, #18
Weekes Jo. 26, Tanner #16
Weekes Marie 28, #17
West Twiford 19
Williamson Ann 18, #15
With Mary 62
Withie Marie 16
Withie Robert 20
Withie Suzan 18, #19
Wood Elizabeth 24, #7
Wood Jo. 26, #8
Wood William 27, husbandman #6
Younglove Margaret 28
Younglove Samuel 1
Younglove Samuel 30

William Lyon, age 14, sworn September 11th 1635

HOPEWELL

The Hopewell was a ship that had been commanded by the famous Capt Henry Hudson on some
earlier voyages, but on the voyage to America in 1632, it was not Capt Henry Hudson at
the helm. This voyage produced a passenger list that was particularly interesting as the
vast majority of the passengers were children. They were mostly young and our ancestor
was amongst them. His name was Foster and he was only 14 years of age and was not
accompanied by an adult. In fact most of these children where unaccompanied. At first
I thought they must be children of earlier arrivals, but then I came across some
interesting reading materials on old London town. It seems, the upper class in London
was getting very frustrated with the many street children running loose in London.
They began arresting them for almost anything and they stood trial. I read of one such
child being hung for stealing a loaf of bread. Most were chosen to be shipped off to
America to be adopted by colonists who had already lost their own children to the
hardships of the frontier or who wanted nothing more than slaves. John Foster, our
ancestor was on such a ship at the age of 14 and he was alone. I believe he was not
adopted as he grew up with the foster name

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