Ingelram de Lions (1040-xxxx)

Ingelram de Lions
aka: Ingeram; Ithleram; Enguerrand; Engerannus; Ingram; de Lyons; Parcarius; Portarius de Linus; le Porter
Born about 1040 Foret-de-Lions Normandy

Descendants:
1. Ranulph de Lions
.. a. Ingelram (Parcar) de Lions
….. i. William Parcarius de Lion
….. ii. Hugh de Lion
2. William de Lions

Sources:

Battle Abbey Roll (Loions)
Duchess of Cleveland, 1889, II 216

Ingelram de Lions came to England 1066 and held Corsham and Culington from the King (Mon. Angl. ii. 604)

Monasticon Anglicanum
Dugale, ed. 1846, II, 604

Crorton: Ingeram le Porter venir ad Conquefium & habuit duas partes de Cosham & CuIington; & habuit duos filios, Willilmum & Hugonem. Et dominus Henricus Rex pater Regis Richardi & Johannis fecit excambium, cum Ingeram le Porter de Cosham & de CuIington, pro duabus parribus de Crorton & de Segbroke: Et Mafilia de Apegard habuit terriam partem de Cosham & de CuIington & fecit fimiliter excambium cum praedicto Henrico, pro terria parte de Crorton & de Segebroke

FALAISE ROLL (Pages 62-63)

INGELRAM de LIONS
The name is derived from the castle and forest of Lions in Normandy [Foret de Lyons is east of Rouyn]. Ingelram de Lions came to England in 1066 and held Corsham and Culington from the king. He had Ranulph, and another son William de Lions received a grant in Norfolk from Earl Walter Gifford and left descendants there.

Ranulph had Ingelram de Lions named Parcar, from being forester of Croxton, Leicester, by exchange with the king2.

William Parcarius de Lion was a benefactor to Croxton abbey during the reign of Henry II and was brother of Hugh de Lion, who was deprived of his estates in 1203. From him descended the family of Parcar or Parker and earls of Macclesfield; hence also the lords Lyon and Glamis, earls of Strathmore and Kinghorn.

King George VI married Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon daughter of 14th Earl of Strathmore whose eldest daughter Elizabeth [present Queen of England].

The Norman People 1874 (Page 317)

Ingelram de lions came to England 1066 (Mon. Angl. ii. 604), and held Corsham and Culington from the King. He had Ranulph, whose brother William de Lions had a grant in Norfolk from Earl Walter Giffard [1085-1102], and left descendants there. Ranulph had Ingelram de Lions, named Parcar, as being forester of Croxton, Leicester, by exchange with the King (Mon. Angl.). William Parcarius de Lions was a benefactor to Croxton Abbey, in the time of Henry II., and was brother of Hugh de Lyons, who was deprived of his estates 1203 (Nicholls, Leicester). From him descended the family of Parcar, or Parker, and the Earls of Macclesfield.

Roger de Lyonn, of the same family, held Begbroke, Oxford, 13th cent, from Walter de Lucy (Testa, 112).

Sir Richard de Lyons held lands in Oxford and Bucks 1276, and was father or grandfather of John de Lyons, who 1334 was summoned from Oxfordshire to attend the King with horses and arms at Roxburgh (Rot Scot. L 306). He in 1343 had charters for lands in Perth and Aberdeen, and from David II and obtained the reversion of the thanage of Glamis. His son Sir John Lyon of Glamis, was Great Chamberlain of Scotland, and from him descended the Lords Glamis, Earls of Strathmore and Kinghorn.

Roger de Leons and the Castle and Forest of Lions in Normandy 1180-85 (MRS). The name is derived from Lions Normandy, descending from William de Lions, in the time of Henry I [1100-1135], of Norfolk, where the family continued in 1346, after which they extended to Essex, Middlesex, and Ireland.

Royal Archaeological Institute
(of Great Britain and Ireland)
Proceedings for 1848
(Pages 128-129)

Memoirs illustrative of the history and antiquities of the county and city of York

Ingeram le Porter came [to England] at the conquest and had two parts of Corsham and Culington, and had two sons, William and Hugh. And the Lord Henry, father of King Richard and of John made exchange with Ingeram le Porter of Corsham and Culington for two parts of Croxton and of Sedgebrook. And Marsillia de Auppegard had the third part of Corsham and of Culington [held by her in frank-marriage] and in like manner made an exchange with the aforesaid Henry for the third part of Croxton and Sedgebrook. … [Corsham and Culington] held by her in frank-marriage.

History of Croxton Abbey

William, Earl of Boulogne, Moreton and Warenne, died in October, 1158, and Croxton manor, along with the patronage of the abbey, reverted to the Crown – to Henry II [1154-1189].
About 1176 he [King Henry II] exchanged Croxton and Sedgebrook for Corsham and Culington in the south of England. A family named Porter, originally coming from Liuns in Normandy, got two thirds of the places and a Masilia de Apgard one third. Both families and their descendants made considerable gifts to the abbey.

Manuscripts of His Grace the Duke of Rutland KG (Volume 4 Pages 174-175)

‘Croxton Abbey Records …. The most important correction to be made in the history of the Abbey is in the name and date of its alleged founder. His name is wrongly given in the Monasticon [Anglicanum] and by Tanner as “Ingeram Porcarius de Linus” … The anme is written quite cleary on FO.39 as portarius de Linus. “Engerannus Portarius” appears on the Roll of the Norman Exchequer for 1180 as having the custody of the castle of Beauvoir-en-Lions with that part of the forest of Lions which bordered on the pays de Bray. (Stapleton’s Rotuli Scaccarii Nonnanuue I. cxiii., cxiv.) …’
[Parker / Parcar / Parcarius / Porcarius / Portarius / Porter]

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